Susan Douglas Essay

Susan Douglas Essay-19
The new momism seems to be much more hip and progressive than the feminine mystique, because now, of course, mothers can and do work outside the home, have their own ambitions and money, raise kids on their own, or freely choose to stay at home with their kids rather than being forced to.And unlike the feminine mystique, the notion that women should be subservient to men is not an accepted tenet of the new momism.The "new momism" is a set of ideals, norms, and practices, most frequently and powerfully represented in the media, that seem on the surface to celebrate motherhood, but which in reality promulgate standards of perfection that are beyond your reach.

The new momism seems to be much more hip and progressive than the feminine mystique, because now, of course, mothers can and do work outside the home, have their own ambitions and money, raise kids on their own, or freely choose to stay at home with their kids rather than being forced to.And unlike the feminine mystique, the notion that women should be subservient to men is not an accepted tenet of the new momism.The "new momism" is a set of ideals, norms, and practices, most frequently and powerfully represented in the media, that seem on the surface to celebrate motherhood, but which in reality promulgate standards of perfection that are beyond your reach.

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He then announces that he has gone on flex time for the next two years so that he can split child-care duties with you fifty-fifty.

The children, chattering away happily, help set the table, and then eat their broccoli. You can't make me," bellows your child as he runs to his room, knocking down a lamp on the way. " he yells and you discover that the cat has barfed on his bed.

The term "momism" was initially coined by the journalist Philip Wylie in his highly influential 1942 bestseller Generation of Vipers, and it was a very derogatory term. ), Wylie attacked the mothers of America as being so smothering, overprotective, and invested in their kids, especially their sons, that they turned them into dysfunctional, sniveling weaklings, maternal slaves chained to the apron strings, unable to fight for their country or even stand on their own two feet.

We seek to reclaim this term, rip it from its misogynistic origins, and apply it to an ideology that has snowballed since the 1980s and seeks to return women to the Stone Age.

Then, while you steamed the broccoli and poached the chicken breasts in Vouvray and Evian water, you and the kids would also be doing jigsaw puzzles in the shape of the United Arab Emirates so they learned some geography.

Your cheerful teenager would say, "Gee, Mom, you gave me the best advice on that last homework assignment." When your husband arrives, he is so overcome with admiration for how well you do it all that he looks lovingly into your eyes, kisses you, and presents you with a diamond anniversary bracelet.No wonder 81 percent of women in a recent poll said it's harder to be a mother now than it was twenty or thirty years ago, and 56 percent felt mothers were doing a worse job today than mothers back then.Even mothers who deliberately avoid TV and magazines, or who pride themselves on seeing through them, have trouble escaping the standards of perfection, and the sense of threat, that the media ceaselessly atomize into the air we breathe.And you may also be worn down by media images that suggest that however much you do for and love your kids, it is never enough. " Whether it's the cover of Redbook or Parents demanding "Are You a Sensitive Mother? Mothers are subjected to an onslaught of beautific imagery, romantic fantasies, self-righteous sermons, psychological warnings, terrifying movies about losing their children, even more terrifying news stories about abducted and abused children, and totally unrealistic advice about how to be the most perfect and revered mom in the neighborhood, maybe even in the whole country.The love we feel for our kids, the joyful times we have with them, are repackaged into unattainable images of infinite patience and constant adoration so that we fear, as Kristin van Ogtrop put it movingly in The Bitch in the House, "I will love my children, but my love for them will always be imperfect." From the moment we get up until the moment we collapse in bed at night, the media are out there, calling to us, yelling, "Hey you! (Even Working Mother -- which should have known better -- had a "Working Mother of the Year Contest." When Jill Kirschenbaum became the editor in 2001, one of the first things she did was dump this feature, noting that motherhood should not be a "competitive sport.") We are urged to be fun-loving, spontaneous, and relaxed, yet, at the same time, scared out of our minds that our kids could be killed at any moment.After dinner, you all go out and stencil the driveway with autumn leaves. You have fifteen minutes to make dinner because there's a school play in half an hour.While the children fight over whether to watch Hot Couples or people eating larvae on Fear Factor, you zap some Prego spaghetti sauce in the microwave and boil some pasta. "Mommy, Mommy, Sam losted my hamster," your daughter wails.Today's mom needs to be a therapist, pediatrician, mind reader, caretaker, consumer safety expert and homemaker. She says there are four main factors that created the new Mom: "Fear, fantasy, marketing and politics." Douglas says, "I think motherhood is the unfinished business of the women's movement. Douglas defines "the new Momism," by saying, "It's a highly romanticized myth of the perfect mother. Her 'to do' list includes: piping Mozart into her womb, using algebra flash cards with her 6-month-old, teaching her 3-year-old to read James Joyce, driving five hours to a soccer match, and oh, yes, being sexy and cheerful through all of this." What are the roots of the "new Momism" - how did we get here?To distract yourself, and to avoid the glares of other shoppers who have already deemed you the worst mother in America, you leaf through People magazine.Inside, Uma Thurman gushes "Motherhood Is Sexy." Moving on to Good Housekeeping, Vanna White says of her child, "When I hear his cry at six-thirty in the morning, I have a smile on my face, and I'm not an early riser." Another unexpected source of Earth-mother wisdom, the newly maternal Pamela Lee, also confides to People, "I just love getting up with him in the middle of the night, to feed him or soothe him." Brought back to reality by stereophonic whining, you indeed feel as sexy as Rush Limbaugh in a thong. Now, if you were a "good" mom, you'd joyfully empty the shopping bags and transform the process of putting the groceries away into a fun game your kids love to play (upbeat Raffi songs would provide a lilting soundtrack).

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Comments Susan Douglas Essay

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    The Rise of Enlightened Sexism by Susan J. Douglas. Today, we once again have what Betty Friedan famously called "a problem with no name." Millions of young women -- the girl power generation -- have been told that they can do or be anything, yet they also believe their most important task is to be slim, "hot," and non-threatening to men.…

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    Susan Douglas’s article on gender bias/stereotypes in TV dramas in relation to Spider-Man. Signs of life article by Susan Doulas needs to be used as reference also. Write on one of the following topics. 1 Examine how Susan Douglas’s arguments about gender bias/stereotyping in T. V. dramas apply to Spider-Man 2.…

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    Susan Douglas’ examination of the last fifty years of popular culture and mass media in her insightful book, Where The Girls Are Growing Up Female With The Mass Media, is a wonderfully frightful and grossly fantastic journey. Fantastic because she actually grew up with the very music, television, and magazines she analyzes and can therefore.…

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    Susan Douglass, Zayed University, Academic Bridge Program Department, Faculty Member. Studies Information Technology, Teacher Education, and Business.…

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    Feb 28, 2010. An essay by Douglas entitled “Girls Gone Anti-Feminist” that touches on the book's themes is available here. Below is an excerpt…

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    Worked under Clarence Thomas as a secretary in the Department of Education for years, came forward about his sexual harassment in 1991 when Thomas was being considered as a Supreme Court justice; faced judgment and disbelief from public, as well as backlash from the black community, which argued that it was more important that a black justice be elected than that exposing workplace harassment.…

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    Douglas explains why women have been torn in conflicting directions and are still struggling today to identify themselves and their roles. Douglas recounts and dissects the ambiguous messages imprinted on the feminine psyche via the media. tags Where the Girls Are by Susan Douglas Strong Essays 647 words 1.8 pages…

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