Learning To Read And Write Frederick Douglass Essay

Learning To Read And Write Frederick Douglass Essay-77
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I learned that literacy allowed slaves to view their “wretched condition, without the remedy,” (262).

Literacy revealed to Douglass just how horrible his condition was.

To explain the anger he felt Douglass says, “…I would at times feel that learning to read had been a curse rather than a blessing.

It had given me a view of my wretched conditions, without the remedy.” (Douglass 262).

–Vanessa Petranek Douglass makes use of a paradox when he is discussing what learning to read and write provided for him. He says that learning to read and write was a blessing because he was able to learn about the world around him and what it really meant to be a slave.

He was able to learn more about the abolitionist movement and if there was any progress towards freeing slaves.

In his essay Douglass says, “The reading of these documents enabled me to utter my thoughts, and to meet the arguments brought forward to sustain slavery…” (262).

In the same paragraph Douglass reveals to the reader how reading was also a curse for him.

He uses words such as “pious”, “discontentment”, “treacherous”, and “thus”.

These words help show just how educated Douglass truly was.

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