Essay On Working Women And Housewife

In imperial China (excluding periods of the Tang dynasty), women were bound to homemaking by the doctrines of Confucianism and cultural norms.Generally, girls did not attend school and, therefore, spent the day doing household chores with their mothers and female relatives (for example, cooking and cleaning).

Regarding family size, a study of three Mexican cities done in 1991 came to the conclusion that there was no significant difference in the number of children in "housewife families" compared to those families with women who worked outside the home.

A research based on 7733 respondents who were aged 18–65 and legally married women in 20 European countries showed men and women share less housework in countries public support gender equality.

Even when homes were very simple, and there were few possessions to maintain, men and women did different jobs.

In rural societies where the main source of work is farming, women have also taken care of gardens and animals around the house, generally helping men with heavy work when a job needed to be done quickly, usually because of the season.

In a traditional Hindu family, the head of the family is the Griha Swami (Lord of the House) and his wife is the Griha Swamini (Lady of the House).

The Sanskrit words Grihast and Grihasta perhaps come closest to describing the entire gamut of activities and roles undertaken by the homemaker.The husband or wife may engage in countless other activities which may be social, religious, political or economic in nature for the ultimate welfare of the family and society.However, their unified status as joint householders is the nucleus from within which they operate in society.Examples of the heavy work involving farming that a traditional housewife in a rural society would do are: .A career woman, as opposed to a housewife, may follow a mommy track or a shared earning/shared parenting track.During the Great Leap Forward and Cultural Revolution, some women even worked in fields that were traditionally reserved for males.In modern China, housewives are no longer as common, especially in the largest cities and other urban areas.Shortly thereafter, a growing number of females began to be permitted to attend schools.Starting with the rule of the People's Republic of China in 1949, all women were freed from compulsory family roles.and non-feminist economists (particularly proponents of historical materialism, the methodological approach of Marxist historiography) note that the value of housewives' work is ignored in standard formulations of economic output, such as GDP or employment figures.A housewife typically works many unpaid hours a week and often depends on income from her husband's work for financial support.

SHOW COMMENTS

Comments Essay On Working Women And Housewife

The Latest from srk-msk.ru ©