A Knights Tale Essay

A Knights Tale Essay-1
As I’ve noted before, that’s pretty much my idea of Hell.Rather, facts have contexts, and that context drives our emotional responses to the facts. From summons, decrees, edicts, warrants, patents of nobility.

As I’ve noted before, that’s pretty much my idea of Hell.Rather, facts have contexts, and that context drives our emotional responses to the facts. From summons, decrees, edicts, warrants, patents of nobility.

Rather than pulling us into the moment, the full truth would push us out of it: rather than fostering the connection between the present and the past, it would have emphasized the separation. but I say this: This movie has the best push into a flashback that I’ve ever seen.

So Helgeland split the difference: he included tons of historical accuracies with non-historical familiarities. As good a job as that opening scene does in establishing this framework, though, my favorite example of how uses these twin presentations of truth is later in the film, when William — now jousting in disguise as Sir Ulrich von Liechtenstein — goes to a dance. It features a medieval training montage to the tune of “Low Rider.” The acting is consistently fantastic, even from relatively “minor” characters like Kate the badass blacksmith (Laura Fraser) and Sir Thomas Colville (James Purefoy). Plus, you know, slow-motion jousting with exploding lances is awesome.

Still, I don’t want to give you the impression that Helgeland just tossed real historical truth out the window. Roland’s concern about the implications of the number 13, for instance, or the fascination with the symbology of the phoenix. please, Christ, rescue me from my current tribula — [Steps on a thorn and uses his teeth to bite it out of his foot] — tions.

Or having patents of nobility with wax seals attached to them.

Does the modern song convey the enthusiasm and pageantry of such events to a modern audience more successfully than an authentic tune would have done?

A Geoffrey Chaucer — thin, energetic and young — who cavorts before the nobles and composes caustic and humorous rhyme, while not the Geoffrey found in the Ellesmere manuscript, certainly conveys the poet’s style (or at least a particular view of that style) in a modern sense.To such keen criticisms, I would reply that I totally get that fantasies aren’t meant to be historically accurate (though they clearly utilize that history and, fantasy or not, “teach” audiences about it), and oh my god I totally enjoy most medieval movies. It took us about five minutes for us to fall in love with it. Honestly, those first five minutes of the film exemplify almost everything that’s great about the movie.After a standard title-card historical synopsis that explains how jousting was a sport of the noble class in the Middle Ages, we meet three young men: William Thatcher (played by the late Heath Ledger), Roland (Mark Addy), and Wat Valhurst (Alan Tudyk). The three young fellows are squires to Sir Ector, and they’re in a bind.There were no symphonies in the fourteenth century, after all.The anachronism is just getting started, though, and how it happens shows that there’s something important at work here: before we know what’s happening, Queen isn’t just the background soundtrack for the audience: it’s what the tournament crowd itself is singing.If he puts on Sir Ector’s armor, he muses, no one will know he’s not a noble.They can get the money, they can eat, and they can deal with the dead man later. The scene now shifts to opening credits that unfold over scenes of the tournament and its crowd …And they’re singing it while doing the wave, eating turkey legs, and waving banners in support of one knight or another.Not one bit of it is accurate to history, yet it’s oh so perfectly historical.The only problem, as the young lads have just discovered, is that Sir Ector Has ceased to be, shuffled off this mortal coil, and gone to meet his maker.He is an Within these few minutes, we see the personalities of all three of these squires, and they’re fantastic.

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